Posted in December 2010

‘Tis The Season

‘Tis The Season

…to plant garlic. Traditionally, garlic may be planted on the shortest day of the year (December 21st) and harvested on the longest (June 21st). Advertisements

Box Of Delights

Box Of Delights

Our recent anticipation was finally rewarded on Sunday afternoon, when two of the lovely ladies from a local rescue centre battled through the snow and ice to bring us… Willow and Xander: six-month old sister and brother who were brought into the rescue centre with their mother and siblings when only two or three days … Continue reading

The White Stuff

The White Stuff

This morning we woke up to a fresh snowfall. Luckily King of the Hill had the foresight to bring our Christmas tree in from the garden last night ahead of the snow, ready to decorate this evening. Fingers crossed that we don’t get too much more snow before tomorrow, as exciting things are afoot… watch … Continue reading

Shooting Star

Shooting Star

For three mornings in a row this week, we experienced some of the deepest hoar frosts seen in the UK for years. I was lucky to be working from home for a couple of these days, and slipped out into the garden first thing to capture this finely wrought beauty. Our young birch tree, standing … Continue reading

The Ivy Man

The Ivy Man

In this old tree stump down the lane, swarmed by ivy, I always see a man standing with his head bowed… Although the ivy has begun to dangle alarmingly from his nose in recent weeks… perhaps he is growing a trunk?

Making Seed Packets

Making Seed Packets

This weekend we were working mostly inside the house. I wasn’t in the garden much, besides half an hour or so chopping kindling for the fire in the icy rain, which nevertheless melted away the last of our snow. Obviously I have made a mistake in allowing my phenomenal axe-handling skills to be witnessed by … Continue reading

Winter Pruning Raspberries

Winter Pruning Raspberries

Last winter we planted bundles of new raspberry canes; three summer fruiting varieties and two autumn varieties. The original canes were cut about 25cm from the ground, and through the spring and summer new sprightly canes sprang up beside them.